Amphetamine & Methamphetamine Detox Treatment Los Angeles

Methamphetamine/amphetamine users are unique in that they often become physically dependent on the substance before they become addicted. This is the biggest danger of the substance, and the reason why so many people have issues with it. It physically alters the brain, leading to long-term psychological symptoms and requiring very special care with trying to detox.

The Detox Process

Methamphetamine/amphetamine detox is an incredibly uncomfortable and potentially dangerous experience. Most people are often discouraged from trying, even if they truly want to stop taking meth. Symptoms can be physical, emotional, and behavioral, with the severity and length determined by the addict’s relationship with meth. The longer the substance was taken, the worse the symptoms are going to be. Since meth suppresses your appetite and need for sleep, most people spend the first few days eating and sleeping.

Long-term meth use can affect a person’s dopamine receptors, affecting the way they experience pleasure. In some cases, a person may feel depressed for up to two years after quitting meth, because the brain has not yet compensated for the way meth affected their dopamine receptors. Relapse often happens for this reason, not because of any physical dependence.

Getting Help

It is important to go through the detox process under the care of a medical team. They can provide you with medications to relieve any physical symptoms while giving you the emotional support you need to stick with the detox process. Getting in-patient detox care can also put you on the right path to getting the proper mental health treatment.

Meth detox is a slow process, which is why it is so important to get personalized care. Visit our Los Angeles Meth detox center where you can get one-on-one support and guidance, along with a personalized treatment plan.

In-Patient Treatment

Once you have gone through your physical detox, you can start getting residential care. Here, you can meet with counsellors, doctors, and other medical staff members to learn more about living with sobriety, how to resist temptation, and how to cope with mood changes in a safe and healthy way. Your residential facility care team can also help you connect with resources in the community, giving you the best possible chance at living a sober life.